Evaluating Unhelpful Automatic Thoughts in CBT

During a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck and Dr. Judith Beck discuss addressing clients’ automatic thoughts that may be true but unhelpful. They describe how therapists can help clients evaluate whether thoughts are productive in helping them reach their goals.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CBT is Effective for Treatment-Resistant Depression in Community Mental Health

State mental health systems have been leaders in the implementation of evidence-based approaches to care for individuals with severe mental illness. Numerous case studies of the wide-scale implementation of research-supported models such as integrated dual diagnosis treatment and assertive community treatment are documented. However, relatively few dissemination efforts have focused on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for individuals with major depression despite evidence indicating its efficacy with this population. A multi-site effectiveness trial of CBT was conducted within the Texas public mental health system. Eighty-three adults with major depression received CBT from community clinicians trained through a workshop and regular consultation with a master clinician. Outcomes were compared to a matched sample of individuals receiving pharmacotherapy. Outcome measures used included the quick inventory of depressive symptomatology and beck depression inventory. Individuals receiving CBT showed greater improvements in depression symptoms than those in the comparison group. Greater pre-treatment symptom severity predicted better treatment response, while the presence of comorbid personality disorders was associated with poorer outcomes.

Lopez, M. & Basco, M. (2014). Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in public mental health: comparison to treatment as usual for treatment-resistant depression. Administration and Policy in Mental Health Service and Research.  DOI:10.1007/s10488-014-0546-4

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Behavioral Experiments in Cognitive Therapy

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the use of behavioral experiments in cognitive therapy. He explains that behavioral experiments are more than just “getting the patient active”. Instead, they are also used to help the client test and then modify inaccurate and unhelpful beliefs that impact healthy functioning.

For CBT resources, visit our website.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CT is as Effective as Fluoxetine in Preventing Depressive Relapses

A recent study published in JAMA Psychiatry showed Cognitive Therapy (CT) to be as effective as medication (Fluoxetine) in reducing the risk of major depressive disorder (MDD) relapse. Participants in the current study included 523 adults with a diagnosis of MDD and a score of 14 or higher on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. They were recruited from clinical referrals and advertisements during 2000 to 2008. Researchers employed a sequential, 3-stage design with an acute phase in which all patients received 12 weeks of CT; an 8-month experimental phase in which responders at higher risk were randomized to receive either a continuation of CT, fluoxetine, or a pill placebo; and a 24-month longitudinal, posttreatment follow up. At the end of the 8-month experimental stage, participants were assessed without treatment at 4 month intervals, continuing for 32 months. Results showed that CT and fluoxetine had almost equal relapse rates during the 8-month experimental phase, which were maintained during the assessment following termination of treatment. While further research is needed to fully understand the differences between psychopharmacological treatment and CT for depression, these finding suggest that CT is a valid alternative to drug therapies.

Jarret, R. B., Minhajuddin, A., Gershenfeld, H., Friedman, E. S., & Thase, M. E. (2013). Preventing depressive relapse and recurrence in higher-risk cognitive therapy responders: A randomized trial of continuation phase cognitive therapy, fluoxetine, or matched pill placebo. JAMA Psychiatry, 70(11), 1152-1160. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1969

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Future of Psychotherapy

At a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck describes the evolution of CBT and its projected trajectory. He proposes that there will be one psychotherapy based on a basic validated theory, with specific formulations and techniques for each disorder. Dr. Beck also discusses a triage system in which specialists would be assigned to clients based on the severity of their symptoms and disorder(s).

For CBT resources, visit our website.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Relationship Between CBT and Neuroscience

In this video from a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the relationship between CBT and neuroscience. Dr. Beck explains that various biological findings have been associated with successful CBT treatment and that preliminary and future research will seek to determine whether certain genomes respond better to different CBT techniques.

For CBT resources, visit www.beckinstitute.org.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Emotional Management Training CBT in Social Settings May Reduce Children’s Anxiety

A recent study published in the Journal of Research in Childhood Education, investigated the effect of using Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) in a social setting on children’s anxiety levels. Typically, children with anxiety have the most difficulty with evaluating and managing emotions, which may lead to poor peer relationships and maladaptive coping strategies. Because anxiety disorders are the most common mental health conditions in children, research on early intervention is warranted. Emotional Management Training (EMT) is a form of CBT that helps children learn to regulate anxious emotions. Participants in the current study were primarily recruited from a New York City mental health clinic and included 58 children, ages 5-14, diagnosed with anxiety disorders. The program included social and therapeutic group activities, as well as CBT skills to help children manage anxious emotions. Specifically, the EMT CBT intervention consisted of psychoeducation about emotional and physical anxiety symptoms, relaxation and meditation therapy, cognitive restructuring, and exposure activities. Results demonstrated overall improvement in anxiety symptoms measured by the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, program satisfaction surveys, self-reports, and therapist and parent reports. These findings suggest that EMT may be a helpful alternative for anxious children in social settings.

Kearny, R., Pawlukewicz, J., & Guardino, M. (2014). Children with anxiety disorders: Use of a cognitive behavioral therapy model within a social milieu. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 28, 59-68. doi: 10.1080/02568543.2013.850130

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Assessing Therapist Competence in CBT

At a recent Beck Institute Workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses how psychotherapists can use self-monitoring tools to measure their competence in CBT. Recording sessions is one way to evaluate and self-reflect on key CBT skills. Dr. Beck also discusses the use of the Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS) which is a tool designed to measure competency and can highlight a therapist’s specific strengths and weaknesses in a session.

For information on the CTRS and CTRS Manual, visit our website.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CBT Improves Adherence and Depression in Patients with Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

According to a new study published in Diabetes Care, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may be an effective intervention for medication adherence, depressive symptoms, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes and depression.  In the current study, 87 adults with unipolar depression and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either enhanced treatment as usual (ETAU) (medication adherence, self-monitoring of blood glucose, and lifestyle counseling) or ETAU plus 9 to 11 sessions of CBT for adherence and depression (CBT-AD). At four months, immediately following treatment, the CBT-AD group showed greater improvements in medication adherence, depressive symptoms, and glycemic control than the ETAU group.  At 8- and 12-month follow ups, CBT-AD remained superior to ETAU on adherence and glycemic control. There was no between group difference on depression, though some evidence of continued improvement was noted for both groups. These findings suggest that CBT is an effective intervention for medication adherence, glycemic control, and depression with lasting benefits for self-management and control among patients with type 2 diabetes and depression.

Safren, S. A., Gonzalez, J. S., Wexler, D. J., Psaros, C., Delahanty, L. M., Blashill, A. J., Margolina, A. I., … Cagliero, E. (January 01, 2014). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adherence and Depression (CBT-AD) in Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. Diabetes Care, 37, 3, 625-33.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Early Views of Cognitive Therapy

In this video from a recent Beck Institute workshop, Dr. Aaron Beck discusses the psychoanalytic community’s early views of cognitive therapy. A common misconception about cognitive therapy was that it could only provide symptomatic relief. Dr. Beck explains, however, that even early in his career, he followed his patients for as long as 5 years and most of them improved and maintained their improvements. Today there are many similarities between cognitive therapy and modern psychodynamic therapy, which Dr. Beck briefly describes here.

For CBT Resources, visit our website.

Share
Posted in BI Blog Info | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment